About

Hi, and welcome to my "Editor's Blog"! In this space I'll be attempting to keep our readers informed on fast-breaking news and issues affecting our islands. Visit often. There's a lot going on!

Enjoy the Island Free Press and, even more importantly, enjoy our wonderful barrier island!!!

Archives

Links

Search

Latest Comments

Salvo Jimmy (Hurricanes: Our r…): Another thing to consider, and Isabel is a good example, is storm surge does not fall off like wind s…
Bud (Rip Currents, Mis…): Folks need to realize that these are not swimming beaches. Proven every season with multiple lives lo…
Bill W (There's trash eve…): How sad that people feel it is okay to just dump their garbage on the side of the highway. I hope tha…
Salvo Jimmy (Hurricanes: Our r…): Diver The Safir-Simpson scale is based on wind speed and was introduced in the early 1970s. Since …
Anonymous (Rip Currents, Mis…): Interesting article, SJ. Thanks.
Bob (Rip Currents, Mis…): I think Elizabeth has a great idea. Film it and place a DVD in each rental home and strongly encoura…

Stuff

Powered by PivotX - 2.3.11 
XML: RSS Feed 
XML: Atom Feed 

You can fish anywhere on the beach -- and other misconceptions about the ORV plan

Friday 26 April 2013 at 4:36 pm

The National Parks Subcommittee of the U.S. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources had a hearing last week on Senate Bill 486, which would overturn the off-road vehicle management plan at the Cape Hatteras National Seashore.

Under the legislation, which was introduced last month by Sens. Richard Burr, R-N.C., and Kay Hagan, D-N.C., off-road vehicles would be managed under the seashore’s Interim Management Plan until Park Service officials present a new final plan that allows more reasonable access to the beaches.

For whatever reason, the National Park Service had a new administration witness at this hearing.  At past hearings, Herbert Frost, associate director of natural resource stewardship and science for the Department of Interior, had presented testimony for the department and the NPS.

This time around, we heard from Peggy O’Dell, deputy director of operations for the Park Service.

Read More

Gamefish bill has arrived, judge in bridge lawsuit is heard from

Friday 19 April 2013 at 3:58 pm

As expected, a gamefish bill has arrived in the North Carolina General Assembly.

Also as expected, it was not introduced as a stand-alone bill.  Stand-alone gamefish bills have not fared well in the past several legislatures.

The bill introduced Wednesday, House Bill 983, addresses not only gamefish status for red drum, speckled trout, and striped bass, but also would create a fund to compensate commercial fishermen for losses related to gamefish status for the three fish, raise the coastal recreational fishing license fee, appropriate funds to support the Marine Fisheries observer program, and provide funding for dredging of shallow-draft inlets.

The gamefish status part of the bill would stipulate that the three fish can be caught only by hook-and-line and only by recreational fishermen. The fish would be off limits to commercial fishermen and could not be bought, sold, or traded.  Wild-caught fish from our own coastal fishing fleets would no longer be available to consumers – in markets or in restaurants.

The bill would be effective July 1.

Read More

An update on a gamefish bill, the bridge lawsuit, and ferry tolls

Friday 12 April 2013 at 4:29 pm

Though the North Carolina General Assembly has been plenty busy, there was apparently no “gamefish” bill introduced this week.

The bill would declare “gamefish” status for three species of fish – striped bass, red drum, and speckled trout. It was the subject of my blog last week.

The bill would stipulate that the three fish can be caught only by hook-and-line and only by recreational fishermen. The fish would be off limits to commercial fishermen and could not be bought, sold, or traded.  They would, therefore, no longer be available to consumers – in markets or in restaurants.

The Coastal Conservation Association of North Carolina, a group that promotes sport fishing interests, pushed to have bills introduced in the General Assembly in 2009 and 2011.  Both attempts died in committee.

Read More

Killing fish for fun instead of food, Part III....WITH READER POLL

Friday 05 April 2013 at 4:19 pm

They’re back again.

For the third time since 2009, the Coastal Conservation Association of North Carolina plans to seek “gamefish” status for three species of fish – striped bass, red drum, and speckled trout.

CCA, a non-profit group that promotes sport fishing interests, lobbied to have bills introduced in the General Assembly in 2009 and 2011.  Both attempts died in committee.

Stephen Ammons, executive director of CCA of North Carolina, said yesterday that the group will try again and that he expects a bill to be introduced in the General Assembly next week.

It would be similar, he said, to bills that have been introduced in the past.

The bill would stipulate that the three fish can be caught only by hook-and-line and only by recreational fishermen.

The fish would be off limits to commercial fishermen and could not be bought, sold, or traded.  They would, therefore, no longer be available to consumers – in markets or in restaurants.

“This is an economic issue for North Carolina,” Ammons said yesterday.  “These three fish are worth more as recreational fisheries than as commercial fisheries.”

Recreational fishermen catch more of each species than do commercial watermen, the thinking goes.  The recreational fishermen spend money to catch these fish, so groups such as CCA think that giving them all of the fish would bring in even more money.

Read More