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Hi, and welcome to my "Editor's Blog"! In this space I'll be attempting to keep our readers informed on fast-breaking news and issues affecting our islands. Visit often. There's a lot going on!

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Looking Back A Year After Hurricane Matthew

Friday 06 October 2017 at 9:50 pm

“We’re still recovering from Hurricane Matthew.”

This sentiment has been echoed quite a bit in the last year.

It’s a phrase that was heard all across the island after the summer power outage, after the menacing approach of Jose and Maria, and after just about every island-wide setback we’ve encountered since last October.

And it’s 100% accurate. Matthew may have eventually arrived in our area on October 9, 2016, as a post tropical cyclone, but the former Category 5 storm left a lot of local damage in its wake.

Record breaking storm surge levels were recorded in Hatteras village with 5.8 feet of water in some areas. A number of lifelong locals reported that the last time they saw water levels remotely close to Matthew was in 1944. And officials estimated that the storm caused $52 million in damages to Dare County alone.

At least 60-70 homes were flooded in Hatteras Village and had to be renovated or demolished. And with local contractors in high demand - and a long wait to acquire funds from insurance companies, grants, loans, personal savings, and any source that was available – rebuilding was a slow process.

So it’s no wonder that nearly a year after Matthew paid Hatteras Island a brief visit that locals and visitors are still getting back on their feet. Take a drive through Hatteras village, and you’ll still see Matthew-related repairs in progress as homes continue to be raised, renovated, or torn down completely.

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