Shooting The Breeze

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Hi, and welcome to my "Editor's Blog"! In this space I'll be attempting to keep our readers informed on fast-breaking news and issues affecting our islands. Visit often. There's a lot going on!

Enjoy the Island Free Press and, even more importantly, enjoy our wonderful barrier island!!!

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pussycat (By the Numbers: A…): Devil Dodo the two percenter, You believe I am posting as “Concerned.” You are wrong. My postings are…
Matt (Is an Indoor Comm…): Why would we take a great idea like this and open it to tourists? Why not let it be a place for local…
paul meadow (A Closer Look at …): Tarheels=bare feet+ pine tar. Our state tree is a pine tree. Nothing to fo with oil or oil leaks or a…
pussycat (By the Numbers: A…): My update from a previous conversation. Dick’s Sporting Goods and Field and Stream are removing and D…
JImH (Is an Indoor Comm…): The pool and boat dock are perfect examples of what the occupancy tax should pay for as it benefits t…
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What Can be Done with Dredged Material from Hatteras Inlet?

Saturday 18 November 2017 at 01:54 am

BY CATHERINE KOZAK


With shoaling problems in Hatteras Inlet channels addressed by recent dredging, charter boat captains and other inlet users can be thankful, at least for the time being, to have safe passage.

An unusually brief meeting in Manteo this week of the Dare County Waterways Commission lacked the sense of crisis and brimming frustration that has often been reflected in members’ remarks. Instead, the focus was more on what has to be done in coming months to permit necessary dredging.

“The channel is pretty good right now,” Steve “Creature’ Coulter, a Hatteras charter boat captain, said in an interview after the meeting. “It’s hard to say if it’s going to continue to be clear.”

But there is another looming challenge to add to the heap of bureaucratic headaches involved in the inlet’s dredging projects: Where to put the dredged material?

“We don’t have any place to dump sand here, except Cora June Island,” Coulter said. But that island, located in Pamlico Sound near the Hatteras ferry dock, is almost at capacity.

For instance, the Corps is scheduled to start its regular maintenance dredging in February of the federal Rollinson Channel used by the Hatteras-Ocracoke ferries, said Roger Bullock, the Corps’ deputy chief of operations. Not only is Cora June almost filled up, he said, parts of Rollinson Channel are comprised of unsuitable silty sand.

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The Repeal of the Plastic Bag Ban – What’s Happening and What’s Next?

Friday 03 November 2017 at 9:21 pm

By JOY CRIST

It’s been a month since the plastic bag ban on the Outer Banks was repealed by the North Carolina General Assembly, and a number of retailers on the Outer Banks have been in a bit of a self-imposed holding pattern on what to do next.

The plastic bag ban was a subtle part of a larger environmental bill, House Bill 56, which was passed by the General Assembly in August, but which was vetoed by Governor Roy Cooper. On October 4, during a special session of the General Assembly, the veto was overridden with a House vote of 70-44 and a Senate vote of 30-9.

Once that occurred, grocery stores and chain retailers were free to re-introduce plastic bags at their Outer Banks locations, but the change back to plastic has been gradual, with a bit of backlash along the way.

As a little background, the plastic bag ban repeal went into effect in 2009 by then then-Senate President Pro Tem Marc Basnight of Dare County. It was an effort to reduce litter on the beaches, as well as to protect sea turtles which often mistake floating plastic bags for jellyfish - one of their favorite local food sources.

There were certainly loopholes to the original law. Durable plastic bags with handles that were at least 2.25 mils thick, and which were specifically designed and manufactured for multiple reuse, were allowed. And stores that had less than 5,000 square feet of retail or wholesale space, as well as less than five stores in the state of North Carolina, were exempt. (You can see the full and original 2009 bill here: http://www.ncleg.net/Sessions/2009/Bills/Senate/PDF/S1018v6.pdf.) But after a while of getting used to the bulky paper bags, the bill became a way of life for roughly eight years.

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